Tag Archives: Tom Threadgill

If You Liked . . . The Escape

31 Mar

My book club members are big fans of romantic suspense in general and Lisa Harris’ books in particular. Everyone liked her latest book The Escape, with one caveat. The ending left the reader with some big questions. The sequel, The Chase, releases in July — not soon enough for many of our members 😉 . If you liked the fast-paced suspense of this novel featuring a strong and competent female character in law enforcement, then I have a few recommendations for you.

U.S. Marshall Service

Seconds to Live by Susan Sleeman

When cybercriminals hack into the US Marshals’ Witness Protection database and auction off witnesses’ personal details to the highest bidders, the RED Team led by FBI Agent Sean Nichols begins a high-stakes chase to find the hacker. But before he can even get started, the first witness is targeted and barely escapes with her life. Sean believes Phantom, an obsessed hacker who previously outwitted the top minds in the field, is behind the attack, and Sean needs this witness’s help, as she’s the person who has come closest to discovering Phantom’s identity. 

Trouble is, she’s a witness under the care of US Marshal Taylor Mills, and Sean is reluctant to work with the captivating marshal who knows his deepest secrets. But Phantom claims he knows where the witness is hiding and will kill her, so to stop the hacker, Sean and Taylor must work through their personal pain and learn to trust each other . . . . The seconds are ticking down before someone dies

Strong Female Character

Network of Deceit by Tom Threadgill

After her rescue of nearly fifty kidnapped children made international headlines, Amara Alvarez gets what she’s worked for: a transfer to San Antonio’s Homicide Division. Reality sets in quickly, though, as her first case, the suspicious death of a teenager at a crowded local water park, brings chaos to her personal life.

As the investigation moves forward and she increases the pressure on the suspects, Amara finds herself under attack by cybercriminals. Her every move is being potentially watched online, and she’s forced to resort to unconventional methods to find the killer. With few leads, she fights to keep her first murder investigation from ending up in the cold case files.

Tom Threadgill is back with another riveting page-turner featuring the detective who is willing to put everything on the line to see that justice is served and lives are protected.

Edge of Seat Suspense

Fatal Strike by DiAnn Mills

There’s a killer on the loose in Galveston, targeting law enforcement officials and using a fatal injection of snake venom to take them down. Authorities have reasons to believe the Veneno gang is behind the hits, and FBI Agents Leah Riesel and Jon Colbert team up to track down those responsible. Their best lead is an eyewitness who identifies a young man dumping the third body on a church doorstep. But their suspect has gone into hiding, and those closest to him are reluctant to reveal anything that might help investigators find him.

As Leah and Jon check connections among the victims and dig deeper into motives, they discover appearances may be deceiving. Someone is desperate to keep their secrets hidden, and Leah and Jon must face their greatest fears in order to stop the next fatal strike.

Top 10 Tuesday — Ruin A Book With One Letter (Or Two)

23 Mar

This week’s Top 10 Tuesday challenge is Funny Titles. I posted on that not too long ago, and frankly I don’t read many funny books, so the titles aren’t either. So I decided to share the ever popular Ruined Titles. Basically, you change one or two letters of one of the words in a book’s title so that a great read becomes, well, ruined. 😉 My apologies to the authors.

For more funny titles, make sure to visit That Artsy Reader Girl.

Top Ruined Book Titles

All Manner of Strings by Susie Finkbeiner

small town sewing

Collision of Pies by Tom Threadgill

pastry train derailment

Daughters of Northern Snores by Joanne Bischof

sleeping in Scandinavia

Echoes Among The Scones by Jaime Jo Wright

past mystery in a pastry shop

Facing The Lawn by Cynthia Ruchti

grief and lawn care

The Mouse at The End of The Moor by Michelle Griep

Victorian city and country mice

On A Coastal Sneeze by Suzanne Woods Fisher

love and hay fever in Maine

The Traitor’s Prawn by Lisa Harris

Chinese spies and seafood

Under a Turquoise Sty by Lisa Carter

desert pig farming

Audiobook Mini-Review: Dead of Winter

8 Mar

How far will he go to have his revenge?

When the fingers of dead women start showing up in the Supreme Court’s mail, ex-FBI Agent Jeremy Winter is brought back to the Bureau to aid in the investigation. Agent Maggie Keeley, his girlfriend and now boss, leads the search for the serial killer. Together, Jeremy and Maggie learn the five remaining cities on the murderer’s list, but they have no idea when the killer will strike or whom he will target.

When they stumble upon a clue at the scene of a young woman’s death, the case focuses on an abandoned ramshackle home in sparsely populated west Texas. As the FBI closes in, the ante is upped in ways no one could have imagined, forcing Jeremy to choose between justice and revenge.

 

Tom Threadgill turned his love of a good tale into a full-time profession. His books have a distinct focus on clean, suspenseful action with strong character development. He is a member of the International Thriller Writers (ITW) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). In his downtime, Tom enjoys woodworking, riding his Harley, and chasing the elusive Yard of the Month award. He currently resides with his wife in the Dallas area and can be reached through his website at TomThreadgill.com.

 

My Impressions:

Dead of Winter is the second book in Tom Threadgill’s Jeremy Winter Thriller series. After the dramatic conclusion to his last FBI case, Jeremy Winter is trying to figure out what to do with his retirement. But a serial killer starts to send dismembered fingers to Supreme Court justices, and Jeremy is called back as a consultant on the case. Along with his girlfriend, FBI agent Maggie Keeley, Jeremy is trying to get one step ahead of an illusive killer. Dead of Winter is again a creep-inducing thriller. The author does a great job of getting inside the murderer’s head. This time religion is mixed up in the motivations. Jeremy is not a believer and Maggie has just a basic understanding of Christian thoughts. It was interesting to see Jeremy puzzling out what the killer was trying to accomplish. While that is the main plot, a subplot introduced in book 1 continues to follow Jeremy and complicate his life. Revenge is a predominant theme, and Jeremy comes to the brink of exacting it without regard to justice. It will be interesting to see this character’s development in the third book of the series, Winter’s Fury.

Dead of Winter is a dark look into what motivates people. If you are a fan of Steven James or Criminal Minds, I think you will like this book. Be sure to read book 1, Coming of Winter, first though.

Recommended.

Audience: adults

(This audiobook was included in my Audible subscription. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

Audiobook Mini-Review: Coming of Winter

3 Mar

Catherine Mae Blackston is missing. She is not the first.

While investigating Blackston’s recent activities, FBI Agent Jeremy Winter stumbles upon a string of missing persons within state parks. Unable to convince his boss that Blackston’s disappearance is anything other than a lost hiker, Winter joins forces with a local police officer to continue the search.

As the clues mount, a dark figure from Jeremy’s past emerges with an ultimatum — one that could force him out of the Bureau. Afraid that his girlfriend, fellow agent Maggie Keeley, will be dragged into a high-stakes political game, he delays his decision. But as the tally of missing persons increases, Winter closes in on the unlikeliest of suspects.

The bodies are out there.

He just has to find them before his past catches up with him.

Tom Threadgill turned his love of a good tale into a full-time profession. His books have a distinct focus on clean, suspenseful action with strong character development. He is a member of the International Thriller Writers (ITW) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). In his downtime, Tom enjoys woodworking, riding his Harley, and chasing the elusive Yard of the Month award. He currently resides with his wife in the Dallas area and can be reached through his website at TomThreadgill.com.

 

My Impressions:

I read Tom Threadgill’s books that feature homicide detective Amara Alvarez and was hooked. When I learned that he had several previous novels and two were included in my Audible subscription, I couldn’t pass them up. Coming of Winter is the first book in the Jeremey Winter Thriller series. Darker than the other two books I had read by Threadgill, this novel focuses on a serial killer. The reader knows who the murderer is early on, and the author really gets into his head. It is a fascinating and decidedly disturbing look into motivations and justifications. FBI agent Jeremy Winter stumbles onto the case and a kind of cat and mouse game begins. Jeremy is an interesting character. FBI for years, he had a traumatic experience in Afghanistan that affects him physically and emotionally. A figure from his past arrives on the scene complicating his forward journey to normal. That loose end continues into book 2. Jeremy’s relationship with fellow FBI agent, Maggie Keeley, is also a great subplot. I listened to the audiobook which I think increased the creep-factor for me. Hearing the killer’s voice made me shiver a bit.

I liked Coming of Winter and jumped right into book 2 of the series, Dead of Winter. If you are a fan of Steven James’ novels or the TV show Criminal Minds, give this one a go.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(This audiobook was included in my Audible subscription. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Characters And Their Jobs

2 Mar

This week’s Top 10 Tuesday features characters with jobs we would like to have. I worked as my husband’s bookkeeper for almost 25 years as I helped him grow his business. It was the right choice for us and helped us achieve our goals. But did I regret leaving upon my retirement a year and a half ago? Uh, no. 😉 While my first year of retirement was a bit different than I imagined, I am enjoying more flexibility and freedom. Not having to plan time off around biweekly payroll is great! So, no, I don’t envy any character’s job!

For a bit of a twist on today’s challenge, I am featuring characters whose jobs play an integral part in their story. They wouldn’t be where they are without the jobs they have. All are recent reads.

For more on character jobs, check out That Artsy Reader Girl.

 

Top Character Jobs

 

Amara Alvarez — homicide detective

 

Josephine Bourdillon — fiction author

 

Caroline Bragg — corporate attorney

 

Evelyn Brand — international journalist

 

Margot De Wilde — codebreaker

 

Madison James — U.S. Marshall

 

Layla Karam — CIA analyst

 

Caitlyn Lindsey — research scientist

 

Alice Grace Ripley — librarian

 

Jeremy Winter — FBI agent

What I’m Reading — Backlists

24 Feb

Have you ever discovered a new author that has been around for a while unbeknownst to you? Isn’t it wonderful when you find an author you just love and then find out there are all these other books to read? Of course, that is, until it sets your TBR pile to teetering. But that’s a topic for another time.

I discovered two new-to-me authors last year. Tom Threadgill writes mystery/suspense. I read Collision of Lies thinking it was a debut. Nope. He has three thrillers published before Collision of Lies. And of course Roseanna M. White is a new novelist only to me. She has several series under her belt and more books to be published. So what to do?

I generally have a very full reading schedule between review books and book club selections. Working in an author’s backlist is almost impossible, but I am trying my best to get caught up. That’s where audiobooks come in. I am on book 2 of Threadgill’s Jeremy Winter Thriller series. Fortunately for me the first two books in the series are included in my Audible membership. These books are decidedly different from my first foray into Threadgill’s writing. Darker — they involve serial killers — they are still riveting reads (or listens).

So that leads to my first question:

 

What do you think about an author’s writing evolution? Change of tone, structure, or subject matter.

 

I had only read 2 of Threadgill’s novels, Collision of Lies and Network of Deceit, before heading to his backlist. I think that helped in becoming comfortable with the change in style and tone. Although comfortable is probably not the word I would describe while reading one of his thrillers. Think Steven James and Criminal Minds.

 

With Roseanna White, I read The Number of Love first because it was a Christy Award nominee in 2020. Although it is the first book in a series, it has secondary characters that had their own books in a previous series. (I have the first book of two of her other series already on my shelves.)

Hence question #2:

 

After discovering a new author, do you immediately go back and read their backlist in chronological order or do you just proceed forward?

 

With White, I haven’t done either. I’m still trying to decide if I want to go all the way back to her first book or finish The Codebreakers series first. Oh what hard reading dilemmas! 😉

 

So what do you think about authors’ backlists?

 

 

Book Review: Network of Deceit

9 Feb

I absolutely loved Collision of Lies by Tom Threadgill. When I heard that he had a sequel, I jumped at the chance to read it. Network of Deceit, featuring kickbutt detective Amara Alvarez did not disappoint. In fact, I think it is better than book 1, and that is saying a lot. If you love mystery and suspense, this book is highly recommended!

 

After her rescue of nearly fifty kidnapped children made international headlines, Amara Alvarez gets what she’s worked for: a transfer to San Antonio’s Homicide Division. Reality sets in quickly, though, as her first case, the suspicious death of a teenager at a crowded local water park, brings chaos to her personal life.

As the investigation moves forward and she increases the pressure on the suspects, Amara finds herself under attack by cybercriminals. Her every move is being potentially watched online, and she’s forced to resort to unconventional methods to find the killer. With few leads, she fights to keep her first murder investigation from ending up in the cold case files.

Tom Threadgill is back with another riveting page-turner featuring the detective who is willing to put everything on the line to see that justice is served and lives are protected.

Tom Threadgill turned his love of a good tale into a full-time profession. His books have a distinct focus on clean, suspenseful action with strong character development. He is a member of the International Thriller Writers (ITW) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). In his downtime, Tom enjoys woodworking, riding his Harley, and chasing the elusive Yard of the Month award. He currently resides with his wife in the Dallas area and can be reached through his website at TomThreadgill.com.

 

My Impressions:

Amara Alvarez, author Tom Threadgill’s kickbutt detective, is back in Network of Deceit, and is this a good one! Amara is new to San Antonio’s homicide division and eager to tackle her first case. And it’s a puzzler. I loved how Amara works through the case and gets down to the facts. Her style is part dogged police work/part intuition, a good combo for a case that may not really be a case. Amara is a wonderfully complex character. She loves her job and her family and has all the angst of keeping things balanced. Her personal life takes a backseat, but she is re-examining that in light of her relationship with Starsky, another detective. It’s a fledgling relationship, but coming along nicely for those who like a little romance thrown in. Family concerns are also keeping Amara a little off-kilter. The case is serious, but Threadgill inserts just the right amount of humor to keep the characters human, if you know what I mean. Amara and the rest are true-to-life, not superheroes or arch villains, but dedicated men and women vs. smart criminals with flaws and vulnerabilities. Although the reader discovers whodunit along with Amara, the ending has a big twist I did not see coming — a big plus in my book.

Network of Deceit is book 2 in a series which just keeps getting better as it progresses. That’s saying a lot, because book 1, Collision of Lies, made my best of 2020 list. This novel will definitely be on the best of 2021 list. I can’t wait see what Threadgill has in store for Amara in upcoming releases.

Highly Recommended

Audience: adults

(Thanks to Revell for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

 

First Line Friday — Network of Deceit

5 Feb

Happy Friday everyone! If you are looking for a book to energize your weekend reading, do I have a recommendation for you! Network of Deceit by Tom Threadgill is a winner. The second book featuring kickbutt San Antonio Police Detective Amara Alvarez explores cyber crime and the dogged police work needed to expose anonymous bad guys.

Here’s the first line:

 

How long could a human being scream?

 

After her rescue of nearly fifty kidnapped children made international headlines, Amara Alvarez gets what she’s worked for: a transfer to San Antonio’s Homicide Division. Reality sets in quickly, though, as her first case, the suspicious death of a teenager at a crowded local water park, brings chaos to her personal life.

As the investigation moves forward and she increases the pressure on the suspects, Amara finds herself under attack by cybercriminals. Her every move is being potentially watched online, and she’s forced to resort to unconventional methods to find the killer. With few leads, she fights to keep her first murder investigation from ending up in the cold case files.

Tom Threadgill is back with another riveting page-turner featuring the detective who is willing to put everything on the line to see that justice is served and lives are protected.

Tom Threadgill turned his love of a good tale into a full-time profession. His books have a distinct focus on clean, suspenseful action with strong character development. He is a member of the International Thriller Writers (ITW) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). In his downtime, Tom enjoys woodworking, riding his Harley, and chasing the elusive Yard of the Month award. He currently resides with his wife in the Dallas area and can be reached through his website at TomThreadgill.com.

 

For more First Line Friday fun, head over to Hoarding Books!

 

Happy Release Day! — Network of Deceit

2 Feb

A very happy release day to Tom Threadgill. The second book in his suspense series featuring Amara Alvarez, Network of Deceit, is now available! I am about half way through with this outstanding novel — I am loving it! Amara is back with her kick butt attitude as she faces hostility from her fellow detectives and an anonymous villain who is complicating her case and her life. Find out all the details below.

 

After her rescue of nearly fifty kidnapped children made international headlines, Amara Alvarez gets what she’s worked for: a transfer to San Antonio’s Homicide Division. Reality sets in quickly, though, as her first case, the suspicious death of a teenager at a crowded local water park, brings chaos to her personal life.

As the investigation moves forward and she increases the pressure on the suspects, Amara finds herself under attack by cybercriminals. Her every move is being potentially watched online, and she’s forced to resort to unconventional methods to find the killer. With few leads, she fights to keep her first murder investigation from ending up in the cold case files.

Tom Threadgill is back with another riveting page-turner featuring the detective who is willing to put everything on the line to see that justice is served and lives are protected.

Tom Threadgill turned his love of a good tale into a full-time profession. His books have a distinct focus on clean, suspenseful action with strong character development. He is a member of the International Thriller Writers (ITW) and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). In his downtime, Tom enjoys woodworking, riding his Harley, and chasing the elusive Yard of the Month award. He currently resides with his wife in the Dallas area and can be reached through his website at TomThreadgill.com.

 

Top 10 Tuesday: New-To-Me Authors of 2020

26 Jan

After reviewing my reading list for 2020 in preparation for this post, I realized I was not a very adventurous reader last year! Top 10 Tuesday is about New-To-Me Authors of 2020. I didn’t have to pare down my list much to achieve just 10. By comparison in just the first month of 2021, I have read 3 new-to-me authors! But what I lacked in quantity, I can say were quality! Some of the books on my list are the writer’s debut, but many are not, causing me to fill my TBR wishlist with lost of backlists.

I’d love to hear which new-to-you authors have become your favorites.

 

For more new authors, check out That Artsy Reader Girl.

Top New-To-Me Authors of 2020

(And Their Books)

 

Above The Fold by Rachel Scott McDaniel

Collision of Lies by Tom Threadgill

A Cross to Kill by Andrew Huff

 

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner

Living Lies by Natalie Walters

Merciless by Tamara Leigh

A Mosaic of Wings by Kimberly Duffy

 

The Number of Love by Roseanna M. White

An Uncommon Woman by Laura Frantz

The Woman in The Green Dress by Tea Cooper