Tag Archives: Marcus Brotherton

Top 10 Tuesday — Headlines!

7 Nov

Happy Tuesday! Today’s TTT topic is titles that would make good newspaper headlines. I chose to turn the books featured today into titles of magazine articles also. Profuse apologies to the authors for this — you’ll see. ūüėČ

For more headline worthy books, check out That Artsy Reader Girl.

Top Titles As Headlines

Obituary Headlines

The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon by Linda MacKillop

The Late Mrs. Willoughby by Claudia Gray

Travel & Leisure

Meet Me in Monaco by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb

Next Year in Havana by Chanel Cleeton

Crime Magazine

The Unhiding of Elijah Campbell by Kelly Flanagan

The Vanishing at Castle Moreau by Jaime Jo Wright

Military History

Facing The Enemy by DiAnn Mills

Rolling Stone

The Songs That Could Have Been by Amanda Wen

Backpacker

The Long March Home by Marcus Brotherton and Tosca Lee

Top 10 Tuesday — Books That Defied My Expectations

5 Sep

Happy Tuesday! I hope you enjoyed your long weekend with some rest and reading. I traveled to Chicago to participate in the Windy City Saga Tour hosted by Jocelyn Green. It certainly defied expectations! It was such a fantastic trip filled with lots of reader-nerd fun. I was especially thrilled to meet in person many of my favorite authors. If you ever get the opportunity to join a literary tour, I heartily encourage it.

Speaking of defying expectations, my list today includes books I knew I probably would like, but didn’t realize how much I would love them. They are a mix of genres, so there is definitely something for everyone. I hope you find a book to love.

Top Books That Defied Expectations

Fatal Code by Natalie Walters

In This Moment by Gabrielle Meyer

The Lady’s Mine by Francine Rivers

The Librarian of Saint-Malo by Mario Escobar

The Long March Home by Tosca Lee And Marcus Brotherton

The Mistletoe Countess by Pepper Basham

The Weight of Air by Kimberly Duffy

When We Were Young And Brave by Hazel Gaynor

Where The Blue Sky Begins by Katie Powner

Within These Walls of Sorrow by Amanda Barratt

Top 10 Tuesday — Reading American History

25 Jul

I am just not feeling today’s Top 10 Tuesday topic — last 10 books I did not finish, or DNF. I just don’t DNF often to have enough for a post. And I have posted a few times on this subject and don’t want to repeat myself. So . . . I am going way off script and continuing my Reading American History series with novels featuring Americans overseas in WWII. Hope you enjoy my non-topic selections. I can almost guarantee you will finish all these books. ūüėČ You’ll notice that several of the books are from author Sarah Sundin — she does WWII fiction so well, that her books are always a must-read for me.

Reading American History — Americans Overseas in WWII

Daisies Are Forever by Liz Tolsma

Far on The Ringing Plains by Murray Pura and Patrick E. Craig

The Last Year of The War by Susan Meissner

The Long March Home by Tosca Lee and Marcus Brotherton

The Plum Blooms in Winter by Linda Thompson

Shadowed by Grace by Cara Putman

The Sound of Light by Sarah Sundin

Until Leaves Fall in Paris by Sarah Sundin

When Twillight Breaks by Sarah Sundin

With Every Letter by Sarah Sundin

Book Review: The Long March Home

10 May

The Long March Home, a WWII-era novel set in the Philippines, is a collaboration of two talented authors — Tosca Lee and Marcus Brotherton. They have created an astonishingly beautiful, yet hard story, with one voice uniting the sacrifice and survival of the courageous men who experienced the Bataan Death March. They don’t shy away from the brutality, and it is again hard. But I feel this is a must-read book: first to understand the time and place, and secondly to understand those who went before us. Very highly recommended!

Jimmy Propfield joined the army for two reasons: to get out of Mobile, Alabama, with his best friends Hank and Billy and to forget his high school sweetheart, Claire. 

Life in the Philippines seems like paradise‚Äďuntil the morning of December 8, 1941, when news comes from Manila: Imperial Japan has bombed Pearl Harbor. Within hours, the teenage friends are plunged into war as enemy warplanes attack Luzon, beginning a battle for control of the Pacific Theater that will culminate with a last stand on the Bataan Peninsula and end with the largest surrender of American troops in history. 

What follows will become known as one of the worst atrocities in modern warfare: the Bataan Death March. With no hope of rescue, the three friends vow to make it back home together. But the ordeal is only the beginning of their nearly four-year fight to survive. 

Inspired by true stories, The Long March Home is a gripping coming-of-age tale of friendship, sacrifice, and the power of unrelenting hope.

Tosca Lee is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of The Line Between, The Progeny, Firstborn, Iscariot, The Legend of Sheba, Demon: A Memoir, Havah: The Story of Eve, and the Books of Mortals series with New York Times bestseller Ted Dekker.

She is the recipient of two International Book Awards, Killer Nashville‚Äôs Silver Falchion, ECPA Book of the Year in Fiction, and the Nebraska Book Award. Her work has finaled for the High Plains Book Award, the Library of Virginia Reader‚Äôs Choice Award, two Christy Awards, and a second ECPA Book of the Year. The Line Between was a Goodreads Choice Awards semifinalist for Best Mystery/Thriller of 2019. In addition to the New York Times, her books have appeared on the IndieBound bestseller list, and Library Journal‚Äôs ‚ÄúBest Of‚ÄĚ lists..

Tosca received her B.A. from Smith College and lives in Nebraska with her husband, three of four children still at home, and her 160-lb. German Shepherd, Timber.


Marcus Brotherton
¬†is a¬†New York Times¬†bestselling author and coauthor dedicated to writing books that inspire heroics, promote empathy, and encourage noble living. His commendations include the Christopher Award for literature ‚Äúthat affirms the highest values of the human spirit.‚ÄĚ

Born in British Columbia, Marcus earned a bachelor’s degree from Multnomah University in Portland, Oregon, and a master’s degree from Biola University in Los Angeles, where he graduated with high honors.

He lives with his wife and their three children in the Pacific Northwest.

My Impressions:

I first have to say that The Long March Home is a must-read novel. It is so many things — a coming-of-age story, a tribute to those who sacrificed for their nation and world. a riveting account of an historical event — but it really goes much deeper than that. It explores the triumph of the human spirit, the love one has for a brother born not of blood, but of shared experiences, and search for purpose in the midst of hell. The book has two narratives, both in the voice of Jimmy Propfield. We get his growing up recollections in a past tense POV, and the present tense experiences of three childhood friends who are not quite men forced to endure extreme hardship and brutality. The structure of the novel is important and really works to get the whole of who the characters were and became. The chapters featuring their childhood also help relieve some of the intensity of the war scenes. Jimmy, Hank, and Billy grow up in Mobile, Alabama during the Depression. They impulsively enlist in the Army for varying reasons prior to America’s entrance into WWII. They land in paradise — boot camp in the Philippines. That is, until December 7, 1941. I was woefully ignorant of just what happened when the Japanese were successful in bombing Pearl Harbor. It was not the only serious Allied defeat that month. The Long March Home is an excellent historical account including fictional and historical figures. It reveals the horrors of war, the atrocities perpetrated by the Japanese, and the astonishing bravery of American soldiers and the people of the Philippines. The war is ever present in the book — it spans days leading up to the attack through the end of the war. Jimmy, Hank, and Billy are larger-than-life characters that are realistically drawn. Their struggles, doubts, fears are relatable to the modern reader. Their story gives insight into the character of those real men who lived through the nightmare of Japanese POW camps. As you can imagine, the will to live ebbs and flows. But strength was shared between the three men ensuring some bit of survival. Lives are changed irreparably, but not always for the worse. There is healing and hope.

The Long March Home was an emotional read for me. It drew me in immediately and never really let me go. I’m still thinking about it days after finishing. I believe it will stay with me forever. It gets a very rare Very Highly Recommended rating. I also strongly recommend you read this with your book club or reading buddy. I will be pressuring my husband to read it in the coming days. ūüėČ

Very Highly Recommended.

Great for Book Clubs.

Audience: Adults (please note this book does not shy away from the brutality of war)

(Thanks to Bethany House for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

First Line Friday — The Long March Home

5 May

Happy Friday! I am so pleased to feature The Long March Home, a WWII-era novel set in the Pacific from two great authors, Tosca Lee and Marcus Brotherton. Their collaboration inspired by true stories is sure to be an excellent book. Look for my review in a few weeks.

Here’s the first line:

I admire the new cut of my khakis in the latrine mirror, flexing just enough to test the stretch of the shirt across my shoulder blades.

Jimmy Propfield joined the army for two reasons: to get out of Mobile, Alabama, with his best friends Hank and Billy and to forget his high school sweetheart, Claire. 

Life in the Philippines seems like paradise–until the morning of December 8, 1941, when news comes from Manila: Imperial Japan has bombed Pearl Harbor. Within hours, the teenage friends are plunged into war as enemy warplanes attack Luzon, beginning a battle for control of the Pacific Theater that will culminate with a last stand on the Bataan Peninsula and end with the largest surrender of American troops in history.¬†

What follows will become known as one of the worst atrocities in modern warfare: the Bataan Death March. With no hope of rescue, the three friends vow to make it back home together. But the ordeal is only the beginning of their nearly four-year fight to survive. 

Inspired by true stories, The Long March Home is a gripping coming-of-age tale of friendship, sacrifice, and the power of unrelenting hope.

Book Review: Feast for Thieves

10 Nov

412130Sergeant Rowdy Slater is the most skilled-and most incorrigible-soldier in Dog Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne, an elite group of paratroopers fighting for the world’s freedom in World War II.

Through a bizarre set of circumstances, Rowdy returns to the States after the war, turns his life around, and falls into the only job he can find-preacher at the sparsely populated community church in Cut Eye, Texas, a dusty highway town situated at the midpoint of nowhere and emptiness.

The town’s lawman, suspicious that Rowdy has changed his ways only as a cover up, gives an ultimatum: Rowdy must survive one complete year as Cut Eye’s new minister or end up in jail.

At first Rowdy thinks the job will be easy, particularly because he’s taking over for a young female missionary who’s held the church together while the men were at war. But when a dark-hearted acquaintance from Rowdy’s past shows up with a plan to make some quick cash, Rowdy becomes ensnared due to an irrevocable favor, and life turns decidedly difficult.

Rowdy’s a man used to solving problems one of two ways: with his rifle or with his fists. Will he be able to thwart his old friend’s evil schemes while remaining true to his new higher calling?

This is a wild ride of a book bursting with a bank robbery, kidnapping, desperate prayers, and barroom brawls. Before the smoke clears, all sides just might end up getting exactly what they want.

 

 

About-Marcus-photo-682x1024Marcus Brotherton is a journalist and professional writer known internationally for his books and literary collaborations with high-profile public figures, humanitarians, inspirational leaders, and military personnel. He has authored or coauthored more than 25 books.

Notable works include We Who Are Alive and Remain, a New York Times bestseller, A Company of Heroes, which ranked No. 1 in the country among World War II/ Western Front books, and the widely-acclaimed Shifty’s War. Marcus’ debut historical novel, Feast For Thieves, released on September 1, 2014.

Born in Canada in 1968, Marcus earned a bachelor’s degree in biblical education and journalism from Multnomah University in Portland, Oregon, and a master’s degree in practical theology and writing from Talbot Seminary at Biola University in Los Angeles, where he graduated with high honors.

Marcus lives with his wife and children in Washington State.

 

My Impressions:

Described as a neo-Western and WWII novel, I really had no expectations about Feast for Thieves, the debut historical novel by Marcus Brotherton. Ne0-Western? This was either going to be a book I loved or one I found boring. Well it is anything but boring! Filled with great characters and a twisting plot, I will recommend Feast for Thieves to anyone no matter their literary tastes.

Zearl “Rowdy” Slater has been drifting since his stint in prison following his discharge from the Army. It is 1946 and there aren’t many prospects for an ex-sniper and convict. So he turns to what at face value is a sure thing — robbing a bank with former cellmate, Crazy Ake. But Rowdy has trouble with sure things and soon finds himself serving as preacher to the rough and tumble west Texas town of Cut Eye.

Feast for Thieves has a lot going for it. First, Brotherton has created interesting, complex and definitely colorful characters. Rowdy is a preacher who knows nothing about being a Christian, let alone preaching. His first sermon involves the Creation and field dressing a squirrel. Bobbie Barker, missionary and daughter of the Sheriff, is a no-nonsence dreamer who spouts poetry and drives a jeep. Sheriff Barker loves the town of Cut Eye and sees its and Rowdy’s potential. Other characters, including Mert the church secretary and Cisco a grieving father, will grab your imagination and heart. Then there is the setting of Cut Eye in the years following WWII. Brotherton brings the west Texas landscape and the struggling town to life. The plot is twisting. You’ll never guess from one moment to the next just where Brotherton is taking Rowdy. At times laugh out loud funny and then poignant, Feast for Thieves will certainly keep you entertained and engaged. Told in Rowdy’s first person voice, the language is richly detailed. I loved the many colloquialisms and colorful descriptions. In describing her fiance, Bobbie says he is as upright and dependable as the color brown.

The best thing about this book has got to be the spiritual journey that Rowdy takes, from his Jacob wrestling struggle in the river to the fist fight in the mission church to the working out of his faith through fights at the local tavern and chopping firewood. Rowdy has grown so much and has so much to look forward to by the closing pages of the book. Will there be another Rowdy Slater book? I hope so.

A novel that grabbed me from the opening pages, I highly recommend Feast for Thieves by Marcus Brotherton. This is one of the best books I have read all year.

Highly Recommended.

Audience: Adults.

(Thanks to Side Door Communication and River North for my review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

To purchase this book, click on the image below.