Tag Archives: classic fiction

Book Review: Out of The Silent Planet

29 Jul

I listened to the audiobook of Out of The Silent Planet, book 1 in C. S. LewisSpace Trilogy about a month ago. Science fiction written by a renowned Christian apologist sounds a bit strange, but as always Lewis manages to reveal truth in the most unlikely places. 😉 It certainly made me think. Written between WWI and WWII, its science seems a bit old fashioned, but the mechanics of space travel are really not the focus of the book. Malacandria (or Mars) is a very foreign place for the reluctant space traveler, Dr. Ransom. His terror in finding himself among the strange terrain and beings is soon overcome by his interest in the linguistics of the planet’s inhabitants. Through his study of their language, he learns things that make him question his pre-conceived notions of God and faith. Scholars have many takes on this novel and its themes. I came away with two — our ability to know God is limited by what we have decided is truth and people tend to view themselves as superior in regards to others based on their perceived intellect and experiences. If you keep in mind the time period in which this novel was written, you can see Lewis’ concerns for the future. If you also read it with the viewpoint of what has transpired since WWII and our most recent history, it will challenge you to go deeper in understanding mankind and God himself.

There are two more books in the series, and I will eventually get to them. The delay will mostly be due to other reading commitments/preferences than desire to see how Lewis plays out the rest of Dr. Ransom’s adventures.

Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(I purchased the audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)

Out of the Silent Planet is the first novel of the Cosmic Trilogy, considered to be C.S. Lewis’ chief contribution to the science fiction genre. The trilogy concerns Dr. Ransom, a linguist, who, like Christ, was offered a ransom for mankind. The first two novels are planetary romances with elements of medieval mythology. Each planet is seen as having a tutelary spirit; those of the other planets are both good and accessible, while that of Earth is fallen, twisted, and not known directly by most humans. The story is powerfully imagined, and the effects of lesser gravity on Martian planet and animal life is vividly rendered.

Top 10 Tuesday — Books Popular The Year I Was Born

2 Feb

I unintentionally tweaked this week’s Top 10 Tuesday. I checked this week’s challenge before doing research and inadvertently settled on books that were published or were bestsellers the year I was born and that I read at least a few years later 😉 . I will own up to my age by saying that 1960 seems to have been a good year for books! I have included children’s, as well as adult fiction, because I have been an avid reader from the get-go. In a world that is all about the next shiny thing, it is great to see many books that have stood the test of time — at least 60+ years of it.

 

Do you read books from days gone by?

 

For more books through the ages, check out That Artsy Reader Girl.

 

Top Books from 1960

Hawaii was the year’s New York Times number one bestseller. I think this was the first book I ever read by Michener. He was a favorite of mine throughout high school.

The saga of a land from the time when the volcanic islands rose out of the sea to the decade in which they become the 50th state. Michener uses individuals’ experiences to symbolize the struggle of the various races to establish themselves in the islands.

 

Here are other favorites published in 1960

 

Are You My Mother? by P.D. Eastman

Green Eggs And Ham by Dr. Seuss

 

The Clue in The Old Stagecoach by Carolyn Keene

The Island of The Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell

 

Exodus by Leon Uris

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Reading Resolutions

12 Jan

A new year with new hopes, that’s what 2021 represents to me. If I can pick a word to describe 2020, it would be distraction. Anxious about many things described this Martha very well. Distraction over health issues, the lockdowns and other restrictions, civil unrest, the unrelenting political squabbling — you name it and I was everything but focused. Of course, 2020 also brought reasons to celebrate. My daughter got engaged, my son’s family was able to spend weeks at a time visiting due to work at home, and my cancer prognosis is excellent! But my reading life suffered the most. Now to most non-bookworms that would earn a shrug. But I know you know what I mean. 😉

This year I aim to be more intentional and that goes for my reading resolutions as well. I am joining other bloggers for a Top 10 Tuesday list of resolutions. I certainly don’t have 10, but I do have a few that I hope ramp up my reading enjoyment. For more bloggers’ lists, check out That Artsy Reader Girl.

 

 

2021 Reading Resolutions

 

Read More

This actually doesn’t mean more books, although I would like to beat the number of books I read last year (103). What I need to do is put down the time wasters — FB, Instagram, and Twitter come to mind — and pick up a book. My time wasted while staying at home more is astronomical. I’m hoping by intentionally getting off social media, I will spend more time in reading pursuits.

 

Read Intentionally

There’s that word again. I have a hard time turning down bright and shiny new books. Hence my towering TBR stack. Part of the problem comes from saying yes to a lot of review requests. I pared that down some last year. This year I resolve to think and think again before accepting reviews.

 

Read from The TBR Pile

All those bright and shiny books get a bit dusty waiting impatiently on the shelf. I recently downloaded Libby and can access lots of audiobooks. I have been reluctant to use Audible credits for books I already own, but with Libby I can check off some worthy reads without feeling guilty. My husband and my budget will be happy! (Below are two notables from my TBR shelf that I want to have read this year.)

 

Read More Widely

I plan to look for books that I would not generally choose either because they are general market or a genre I don’t usually read. I am part of a FB book club that reads mystery/suspense and have been introduced to books I have never heard of, yet enjoyed immensely. This month I am listening to The June Boys by Courtney C. Stevens. It is a YA mystery/thriller. I have found it intriguing even as I have cringed at some of the scenes. This novel is really expanding my horizons.

 

I would also like to add international and classic novels to my reading this year. Libby is a great resource for this extracurricular reading. I also have many physical copies that I need to read.

 

What are some of your reading resolutions?

 

 

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Books I Wish I Had Read As A Child

8 Sep

While I have always been a voracious reader, my tastes have always run towards mysteries. Nancy Drew was my first book heroine, and I soon moved on to all things Agatha Christie. I visited the library frequently, both public and school, and was gifted books for every occasion. Yet somehow I missed reading all the standard children’s classics. So today’s Top 10 Tuesday post is all about missed opportunities 😉 . My daughter didn’t like to read as a child, so I missed some vicarious reading. Her brothers made up for it, but Poulson and Dahl were their favorites. I have another chance though — my first grandchild ( a girl) will have all the books!

What books do you wish you had read as a child?

Find out more bloggers’ lists at That Artsy Reader Girl.

 

 

Top Books I Wish I Had Read As A Child

 

Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Eleven-year-old Anne Shirley has never known a real home. Since her parents’ deaths, she’s bounced around to foster homes and orphanages. When she is sent by mistake to live with Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she wants to stay forever. But Anne is not the sturdy boy Matthew and Marilla were expecting.
 
She’s a mischievous, talkative redheaded girl with a fierce temper, who tumbles into one scrape after another. Anne is not like anybody else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special, a girl with an enormous imagination. All she’s ever wanted is to belong somewhere. And the longer she stays at Green Gables, the harder it is for anyone to imagine life without her.

The Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis

Four adventurous siblings — Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie — step through a wardrobe door and into the land of Narnia, a land frozen in eternal winter and enslaved by the power of the White Witch. But when almost all hope is lost, the return of the Great Lion, Aslan, signals a great change . . . and a great sacrifice.

Open the door and enter a new world! The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is the second book in C. S. Lewis’s classic fantasy series, which has been captivating readers of all ages with a magical land and unforgettable characters for over sixty years.

Little House on The Prairie series (this book is actually #3 in the series) by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Laura Ingalls and her family are heading to Kansas! Leaving behind their home in the Big Woods of Wisconsin, they travel by covered wagon until they find the perfect spot to build a little house on the prairie. Laura and her sister Mary love exploring the rolling hills around their new home, but the family must soon get to work, farming and hunting and gathering food for themselves and for their livestock. Just when the Ingalls family starts to settle into their new home, they find themselves caught in the middle of a conflict. Will they have to move again?

The nine books in the timeless Little House series tell the story of Laura’s real childhood as an American pioneer, and are cherished by readers of all generations. They offer a unique glimpse into life on the American frontier, and tell the heartwarming, unforgettable story of a loving family.

A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Alone in a new country, wealthy Sara Crewe tries to settle in and make friends at boarding school. But when she learns that she’ll never see her beloved father gain, her life is turned upside down. Transformed from princess to pauper, she must swap dancing lessons and luxury for hard work and a room in the attic. Will she find that kindness and genorosity are all the riches she truly needs?

 

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Ten year old Mary Lennox, a spoiled and pompous child from a wealthy family, is suddenly turned on end when her parents die. She is sent to live with her wealthy Uncle in his isolated house in Yorkshire, England. Her spoiled nature and aggression again take form in her new home, but soon a servant informs her of a private, walled-in garden with the entrance’s key missing. The mysterious and cordoned garden intrigues young Mary as much as the mysterious cries that echo the hallways during the night.

 

Top 10 Tuesday — The Long of It

9 Oct

I used to be a big fan of chunksters — big, fat books that would take me a very long time to read. Back in my school years I was especially fond of James Michener books for that very reason. It was wonderful to immerse myself in the sagas that took me to another time and place. Alas, today I rarely indulge in books over 400 pages, let alone those that approach the 1000 page mark. Today on Top 10 Tuesday, bloggers are sharing the longest books they have read (be sure to head over there to see what is on their lists). While I rarely kept a page count back in the day, my list includes books I enjoyed and that are long enough to take you away for a good long time. There are a couple you may be unwilling to try 😉 , but I bet you’ll find at least one to intrigue you.

 Big Fat Books I Loved

Bleak House by Charles Dickens 

Byzantium by Stephen Lawhead

Centennial by James Michener

Hawaii by James Michener

Moby-Dick by Herman Melville 

The Robe by Lloyd C. Douglas

Ruska by Edward Rutherford

Sarum by Edward Rutherfurd

 

How about you, do you like big books? Don’t lie!

Top 10 Tuesday — Unbelievable Books

30 Jan

This week’s Top 10 Tuesday theme is books I can’t believe I read. I don’t think that any book I’ve read I regretted or was astonished I finished. Some I loved more than others; some are a bit forgettable (see last week’s post). So I tweaked this week’s theme a bit and came up with books that were part of a self-imposed reading challenge of classic mysteries. I title this Classic Mystery/Crime/Detective Novels That I Can’t Believe I Did Not Know About Before I Read Them. Die-hard fans may yawn at this list, but I loved discovering books from the early days of mystery fiction when authors were trying out all the devices, plot twists, and tropes that are standard today. Next week I promise not to monkey around with the theme. 😉

To find out what books other bloggers cannot believe they read, click HERE.

 

Top 12 Classic Mystery Fiction I Can’t Believe I Didn’t Know About

Bat Wing by Sax Rohmer

The Big Bow Mystery by Israel Zangwill

The “Canary” Murder Case by S. S. van Dine

The Deserted House by E. T. A. Hoffman

The Haunted Bookshop by Christopher Morley

The Lodger by Marie Belloc Lowndes

The Man Who Knew Too Much by G. K. Chesterton

Midnight in Beauchamp Row by Anna Katherine Green

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

The Red House Mystery by A. A. Milne

The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan

The Window at The White Cat by Mary Roberts Rheinhart

 

What book can’t you believe you read?

 

Top 10 Tuesday — Summer Reading Lists

18 Jul

When my children were in High School they had summer reading assignments. I was all —  I wish we had that when I was in school! They were all — meh! LOL! The problem really wasn’t that they were expected to read; I had made forced urged them to do that every summer of their school years. It was more the books that were on the list.

Summer is about to close for kids here in middle Georgia. My home county’s schools start in just 3 short weeks. At this point, my children would just now be cracking open their assigned books. And I would be threatening urging them to get to it. Would it have been different if I could have created the list with books that are entertaining, suspenseful, full of action and passion?  I like to think so.

So here are the books I would put on a summer reading list for High School-aged kids. My list is a mix of Classics and Christian fiction. What do you think?

Top Books for Summer Reading

American History — The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara

“My favorite historical novel . . . a superb re-creation of the Battle of Gettysburg, but its real importance is its insight into what the war was about, and what it meant.”—James M. McPherson
 
In the four most bloody and courageous days of our nation’s history, two armies fought for two conflicting dreams. One dreamed of freedom, the other of a way of life. Far more than rifles and bullets were carried into battle. There were memories. There were promises. There was love. And far more than men fell on those Pennsylvania fields. Bright futures, untested innocence, and pristine beauty were also the casualties of war. Michael Shaara’s Pulitzer Prize – winning masterpiece is unique, sweeping, unforgettable — the dramatic story of the battleground for America’s destiny.

American Literature — A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

The American classic about a young girl’s coming-of-age at the turn of the century.

From the moment she entered the world, Francie needed to be made of stern stuff, for the often harsh life of Williamsburg demanded fortitude, precocity, and strength of spirit. Often scorned by neighbors for her family’s erratic and eccentric behavior-such as her father Johnny’s taste for alcohol and Aunt Sissy’s habit of marrying serially without the formality of divorce-no one, least of all Francie, could say that the Nolans’ life lacked drama. By turns overwhelming, sublime, heartbreaking, and uplifting, the Nolans’ daily experiences are tenderly threaded with family connectedness and raw with honesty. Betty Smith has, in the pages of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, captured the joys of humble Williamsburg life-from “junk day” on Saturdays, when the children of Francie’s neighborhood traded their weekly take for pennies, to the special excitement of holidays, bringing cause for celebration and revelry. Betty Smith has artfully caught this sense of exciting life in a novel of childhood, replete with incredibly rich moments of universal experiences — a truly remarkable achievement for any writer.

British History — The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey

“One of the best mysteries of all time” (The New York Times)—Josephine Tey recreates one of history’s most famous — and vicious —crimes in her classic bestselling novel, a must read for connoisseurs of fiction, now with a new introduction by Robert Barnard.

Inspector Alan Grant of Scotland Yard, recuperating from a broken leg, becomes fascinated with a contemporary portrait of Richard III that bears no resemblance to the Wicked Uncle of history. Could such a sensitive, noble face actually belong to one of the world’s most heinous villains—a venomous hunchback who may have killed his brother’s children to make his crown secure? Or could Richard have been the victim, turned into a monster by the usurpers of England’s throne? Grant determines to find out once and for all, with the help of the British Museum and an American scholar, what kind of man Richard Plantagenet really was and who killed the Little Princes in the Tower.

The Daughter of Time is an ingeniously plotted, beautifully written, and suspenseful tale, a supreme achievement from one of mystery writing’s most gifted masters.

British Literature — The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

The novel that T. S. Eliot called “the first, the longest, and the best of the modern English detective novels”

Guarded by three Brahmin priests, the Moonstone is a religious relic, the centerpiece in a sacred statue of the Hindu god of the moon. It is also a giant yellow diamond of enormous value, and its temptation is irresistible to the corrupt John Herncastle, a colonel in the British Army in India. After murdering the three guardian priests and bringing the diamond back to England with him, Herncastle bequeaths it to his niece, Rachel, knowing full well that danger will follow. True to its enigmatic nature, the Moonstone disappears from Rachel’s room on the night of her eighteenth birthday, igniting a mystery so intricate and thrilling it has set the standard for every crime novel of the past one hundred fifty years.

Widely recognized, alongside the stories of Edgar Allan Poe, as establishing many of the most enduring conventions of detective fiction, The Moonstone is Wilkie Collins’s masterwork and one of the greatest novels of the nineteenth century.

Current Events — The Beloved Daughter by Alana Terry

In a small North Korean village, a young girl struggles to survive. Catastrophic floods have ravaged her countryside. But it is her father’s faith, not the famine of North Hamyong Province, that most threatens Chung-Cha’s well-being. Is Chung-Cha’s father right to be such a vocal believer? Or is he a fool to bring danger on the head of his only daughter? Chung-Cha is only a girl of twelve and is too young to answer such questions. Yet, she is not too young to face a life of imprisonment and forced labor. Her crime? Being the daughter of a political dissident.

The Beloved Daughter follows Chung-Cha into one of the most notorious prison camps the contemporary free world has known. Will Chung-Cha survive the horrors of Camp 22? And if she does survive, will her faith remain intact?

The Beloved Daughter is Alana Terry’s debut Christian novel and has won awards from Readers’ Favorite, Grace Awards, Women of Faith, The Book Club Network, and others.

Philosophy — The Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce is a classic Christian allegorical tale about a bus ride from hell to heaven. An extraordinary meditation upon good and evil, grace and judgment, Lewis’s revolutionary idea in the The Great Divorce is that the gates of Hell are locked from the inside. Using his extraordinary descriptive powers, Lewis’ The Great Divorce will change the way we think about good and evil.

 

 

 

Physics — The Skin Map by Stephen Lawhead

It is the ultimate quest for the ultimate treasure. Chasing a map tattooed on human skin. Across an omniverse of intersecting realities. To unravel the future of the future.

Kit Livingstone’s great-grandfather appears to him in a deserted alley during a tumultuous storm. He reveals an unbelievable story: that the ley lines throughout Britain are not merely the stuff of legend or the weekend hobby of deluded cranks, but pathways to other worlds. To those who know how to use them, they grant the ability to travel the multi-layered universe of which we ordinarily inhabit only a tiny part.

One explorer knew more than most. Braving every danger, he toured both time and space on voyages of heroic discovery. Ever on his guard and fearful of becoming lost in the cosmos, he developed an intricate code—a roadmap of symbols—that he tattooed onto his own body. This Skin Map has since been lost in time. Now the race is on to recover all the pieces and discover its secrets.

But the Skin Map itself is not the ultimate goal. It is merely the beginning of a vast and marvelous quest for a prize beyond imagining.

The Bright Empires series—from acclaimed author Stephen R. Lawhead—is a unique blend of epic treasure hunt, ancient history, alternate realities, cutting-edge physics, philosophy, and mystery. The result is a page-turning, adventure like no other.

Psychology — Strangers on A Train by Patricia Highsmith

“For eliciting the menace that lurks in familiar surroundings, there’s no one like Patricia Highsmith.” ―Time

The world of Patricia Highsmith has always been filled with ordinary people, all of whom are capable of very ordinary crimes. This theme was present from the beginning, when her debut, Strangers on a Train, galvanized the reading public. Here we encounter Guy Haines and Charles Anthony Bruno, passengers on the same train. But while Guy is a successful architect in the midst of a divorce, Bruno turns out to be a sadistic psychopath who manipulates Guy into swapping murders with him. “Some people are better off dead,” Bruno remarks, “like your wife and my father, for instance.” As Bruno carries out his twisted plan, Guy is trapped in Highsmith’s perilous world, where, under the right circumstances, anybody is capable of murder.

The inspiration for Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1951 film, Strangers on a Train launched Highsmith on a prolific career of noir fiction, proving her a master at depicting the unsettling forces that tremble beneath the surface of everyday contemporary life.

World History — Cry, The Beloved Country by Alan Paton

A work of searing beauty, Cry, the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of Stephen Kumalo, a Zulu pastor, and his son, Absalom. It is also the story of a land and a people riven by racial injustice, reflecting the troubled and changing South Africa of the 1940s. The book is written with such keen compassion and understanding that the listener shares fully in the gravity of the characters situations. Alan Paton said of his book: “It is a song of love for one’s far distant country….” Thus, it is a tale that is passionately African while also being timeless and universal. But ultimately, Cry, the Beloved Country is a work of love and hope, of courage and tragedy, born of the dignity of man.

All School Read — The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

Set against the turbulent years of the Napoleonic  era, Alexandre Dumas’s thrilling adventure story  is one of the most widely read romantic novels of  all time. In it the dashing young hero, Edmond  Dantès, is betrayed by his enemies and thrown  into a secret dungeon in the Chateau d’If — doomed  to spend his life in a dank prison cell. The story  of his long, intolerable years in captivity, his  miraculous escape, and his carefully wrought  revenge creates a dramatic tale of mystery and intrigue  and paints a vision of France — a dazzling,  dueling, exuberant France — that has become immortal.  

 

 

What books would you include on a Summer Reading List?

Top 10 Tuesday — Classics I Love and Classics I Don’t

21 Feb

The folks at The Broke And The Bookish are talking books we loved more than we thought we would and/or books we found kind of disappointing. I thought I would take the coward’s way and talk about Classics — you know, so no one would get their feelings hurt 😉 . To find out what other bloggers are talking about, click HERE.

toptentuesday

 

I am a book nerd without apology. I love a really good classic, and by good, I mean one that is highly readable. The kind that I would recommend to normal people; the kind that I think just about anyone could (or should 😉 ) enjoy! I’m not talking Finnegans Wake, but Jane Eyre (a book I knew I would love from the start). My list this week includes classics I just wasn’t sure of, but found I loved. Books that I easily can recommend. I have also included a few beloved classics — beloved by others, but not by me! Books that many love, but I just don’t understand why. So without further ado, here is my Top 10 Tuesday list:

Classics I Didn’t Think I’d Like, But Found I Loved.

Bleak House by Charles Dickens — I have to admit that I picked this book up after seeing just one episode of the BBC miniseries. This 900+ page book is a gem. If you didn’t like A Tale of Two Cities in ninth grade (I didn’t), don’t despair. This book is so much better!

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens — this book is a masterpiece of description. Way better than any movie version.

Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott — I started this book in college and never finished, although I did write a paper on it. Cringe! Later, having endured years of guilt, I started it anew. Loved. It.

Moby Dick by Herman Melville — this novel was another college assignment that I did finish. At first I thought whales, ships, uh no! But I loved this book. I loved it so much I talked about it with my youngest son, who also loves it. He in turn told his dad he had to read it. My husband? Not so much. He couldn’t get past the whales and ships . . . .

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Beloved Classics, But Not By Me!

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen — I know it may be almost blasphemy not to like a Jane Austen novel, but I cannot help myself. Austen is one of my very favorite authors and I love Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Emma  . . . . But I just can’t get into this novel. I didn’t like any of the movie adaptations I have seen either.

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen — now I know you really think I’ve gone too far, but Catherine Morland is just plain silly, and unlikable to boot! Again, I didn’t like the movies.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte — I loved Jane Eyre by sister Charlotte, and Villette by sister Anne is one of my all time favorites. But I wish Cathy and Heathcliff had just gotten lost on the moors at the beginning of the book and put this reader out of her misery!

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What about you?

Which books did you love and/or hate more than you thought?

 

December Book Club Picks

1 Dec

Every December my two book clubs, By The Book and Page Turners, pick Christmas themed reads. This year we are reading Keeping Christmas by Dan Walsh and A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote. Dan Walsh is a big favorite of By The Book — always heartwarming. And since we read To Kill A Mockingbird this year, Page Turners thought it was fitting to read a Christmas short story by the inspiration for Dill.

Have you read these stories?

Let us know what you thought.

UnknownFor the first time since their children were born, empty nesters Judith and Stan Winters spent Thanksgiving without the kids, and it’s looking like Christmas will be the same. Judith can’t bring herself to even start decorating for the holiday; her kids always hung the first ornaments on the tree, ornaments they had made each year since they were toddlers. Sure they were strange-looking–some could be called downright ugly–but they were tradition. A tradition she’s heartbroken to miss this year.

With Judith refusing to decorate the bare spruce tree in their living room, Stan knows something must be done. And his only hope for saving the holiday is found in a box of handmade ornaments.

Fan-favorite Dan Walsh invites readers to enjoy this nostalgic Christmas story that celebrates all of our most cherished seasonal traditions, especially the importance of family. Readers will join in remembering the things that make their own Christmas season so special.

 

UnknownSeven-year-old Buddy inaugurates the Christmas season by crying out to his cousin, Miss Sook Falk: “It’s fruitcake weather!” Thus begins an unforgettable portrait of an odd but enduring friendship between two innocent souls — one young and one old — and the memories they share of beloved holiday rituals.

Fun Things for Readers: BabyLit

23 Jul

51HcNinPQ2L._AC_UL160_SR160,160_From the creative mind of Jennifer Adams and the delightful art of Alison Oliver come children’s books inspired by literary classics. If you want to set your child, niece. nephew or grandchild on the right track of a life in love with books, consider investing in these adorable books. Because I love Jane Austen, I love her Austen-inspired books, but the BabyLit line also includes Anna Karenina, Wuthering Heights, Dracula and more. Here are a few to tease and delight:

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To purchase books, click HERE.

 

jen_library_13-200x300Jennifer Adams is the author of thirty books, including the board books in the bestselling BabyLit series, which introduce small children to the world of classic literature.

Her children’s picture books, Edgar Gets Ready for Bed, Edgar and the Tattle-Tale Heart and Edgar and the Tree House of Usher are inspired by Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven.” She also has two new picture books forthcoming from HarperCollins.

Her titles also include books for adults, including Y is for Yorick, a slightly irreverent look at Shakespeare, and Remarkably Jane, notable quotations on Jane Austen.

Jennifer graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle. She has 20 years’ experience as a book editor, most recently at Gibbs Smith, Publisher and Quirk Books. She works some evenings at her local independent bookstore, The King’s English, to feed her book habit. Jennifer lives in Salt Lake City with her husband, Bill Dunford, who is also a writer.