Tag Archives: weekly meme

Mailbox Monday

22 Aug

Mailbox Monday is a gathering place for readers to share the books that came into their house last week and explore great book blogs.  Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists. Mailbox Monday was created by Marcia of A Girl and Her Books and is being hosted by Staci of Life in the Thumb this month.

 

 

Here are the books that arrived in my house last week:

 

For Review:

Falls Like Lightning by Shawn Grady.  When hotshot smoke jumper Silas Kent gets his own fire crew, he thinks he’s achieved what he’s always wanted. But a lightning-sparked fire in the Desolation Wilderness of the Sierra Nevadas has his team in a plane before they can even train together.  Pilot Elle Westmore has been called up to drop the crew into the heart of the forest infernos. A single mother of a mysteriously ill six-year-old, she can’t imagine her life getting any more complicated.

 

 

Free From Kindle:

Hurricanes in Paradise by Denise Hildreth.  Since starting her new job at a Paradise Island resort, Riley Sinclair feels the pieces of her life finally coming together—until she discovers that some guests arrive with their own demons, fears, and secrets. With a hurricane headed straight for the island, will Riley and three women find healing—and friendship—through the storm?

 

 

 

Clear Blue Sky by F. B. Lione.  It’s the beginning of a gorgeous September in the City that Never Sleeps. Summer may be officially over, but Labor Day Weekend means ethnic festivals and dancing the streets and lots of overtime for police officer Tony Cavalucci. When crowd control gets unusually dangerous, Tony starts to wonder why he even does this kind of work. And going home doesn’t bring him any more respect. His neurotic and dramatic family disapproves of both Tony’s fiancé and his new-found faith.

All this foreshadows what’s about to come to the people of New York on September 11, 2001. Normal day-to-day events and fantastic weather lead up to the most difficult day in the city’s history. Now Tony finds himself in brand new territory. As he fights to survive and help others survive as well, Tony learns all over what faith means, what family means, and what life itself means. The author of this highly compelling novel is an ex-cop who survived the World Trade Center rescue efforts. Consequently, the storytelling throughout the book rings with authenticity. All of this makes for a fast-paced and deeply moving page-turner that is at times funny, at times horrible, and always full of humanity, compassion, and the presence of God. 

 

I started volunteering at a local women’s rehabilitation and training center.  Most of the women have been released from prison and stay at the center for 90 – 120 days.  They learn various skills, both personal and professional to help them to reenter the community and work force.  Among other things, we have started a book club of sorts.  We will be reading The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith.  We read chapter 1 together last week and it was a hit!  I go back today for chapter 2 or wherever they have stopped in their reading.  I have to say, the expressions on the ladies faces when we said the copies of the book were for them to keep were priceless.  This promises to be the best book club I have ever been involved with.

So I picked up a Kindle version of the book this past week.  I read it years ago, but that copy is long gone.

 

The African-born author of more than 50 books, from children’s stories (The Perfect Hamburger) to scholarly works (Forensic Aspects of Sleep), turns his talents to detection in this artful, pleasing novel about Mma (aka Precious) Ramotswe, Botswana’s one and only lady private detective. A series of vignettes linked to the establishment and growth of Mma Ramotswe’s “No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency” serve not only to entertain but to explore conditions in Botswana in a way that is both penetrating and light thanks to Smith’s deft touch. Mma Ramotswe’s cases come slowly and hesitantly at first: women who suspect their husbands are cheating on them; a father worried that his daughter is sneaking off to see a boy; a missing child who may have been killed by witchdoctors to make medicine; a doctor who sometimes seems highly competent and sometimes seems to know almost nothing about medicine. The desultory pace is fine, since she has only a detective manual, the frequently cited example of Agatha Christie and her instincts to guide her. Mma Ramotswe’s love of Africa, her wisdom and humor, shine through these pages as she shines her own light on the problems that vex her clients. Images of this large woman driving her tiny white van or sharing a cup of bush tea with a friend or client while working a case linger pleasantly.