Book Review: The Courier of Caswell Hall

28 Sep

934262_w185An unlikely spy discovers freedom and love in the midst of the American Revolution. As the British and Continental armies wage war in 1781, the daughter of a wealthy Virginia plantation owner feels conflict raging in her own heart. Lydia Caswell comes from a family of staunch Loyalists, but she cares only about peace. Her friend Sarah Hammond, however, longs to join the fight. Both women’s families have already been divided by a costly war that sets father against son and neighbor against neighbor; a war that makes it impossible to guess who can be trusted. One snowy night Lydia discovers a wounded man on the riverbank near Caswell Hall, and her decision to save him will change her life. Nathan introduces her to a secret network of spies, couriers, disguises, and coded messages—a network that may be the Patriots’ only hope for winning the war. When British officers take over Caswell Hall and wreak havoc on neighboring plantations, Lydia will have to choose between loyalty and freedom; between her family’s protection and her own heart’s desires. As both armies gather near Williamsburg for a pivotal battle, both Lydia and Sarah must decide how high a price they are willing to pay to help the men they love.

MDobson-73Melanie Dobson is the author of twelve novels; her writing has received numerous accolades including two Carol Awards. Melanie worked in public relations for fifteen years before she began writing fiction full-time. Born and raised in the Midwest, she now resides with her husband and two daughters in Oregon.

Find out more about Melanie at http://www.melaniedobson.com.

My Impressions:

The Courier of Caswell Hall is sure to be a winner with history lovers as well as romance fans. There is even some breath-holding suspense! Melanie Dobson has a winner in her An American Tapestry series offering that highlights the last years of the American Revolution.

Lydia Caswell is not really concerned with the politics of the Rebellion against Britain and King George. As the privileged daughter of a loyalist planter in Virginia, she merely yearns for the end of the war and a return to life as usual — the dinners, teas and balls her family was accustomed to hosting. The war has killed her beloved grandfather, taken away her betrothed and estranged her family from old friends and neighbors. But when Lydia finds an injured and half dead man on her family’s plantation, her views on the Rebellion begin to change. She soon finds herself a part of the patriots’ spy network and her heart turned toward the mysterious man that is a big part of it.

The historical aspects of The Courier of Caswell Hall are spot on — from the military maneuvers to common customs to slavery in the colonies. I found all of this fascinating and learned quite a bit as well. The characters are very well-devoloped and realistic — from dedicated patriots, slaves, British soldiers to loyalist citizens. Their emotions, motives and actions portray the nature of both sides of the American Revolution. Historical figures and events are included to give this novel a feeling of truth. The great sacrifice by our founders to achieve freedom is profoundly portrayed; a great lesson for all Americans today.

The Courier of Caswell Hall is a great read — check it out today!

Recommended.

Great for Book Clubs.

(Thanks to Summerside Press and LitFuse for a review copy of this book. The opinions expressed are mine alone.)

To read other reviews, click HERE.

To purchase a copy of this book, click on the image below.

Welcome to the blog tour for Melanie Dobson‘s latest release, The Courier of Caswell HallAn unlikely spy discovers freedom and love in the midst of the American Revolution in the newest book in the American Tapestries™ series.

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Enter to win 1 of 5 copies of the book!

Five winners will receive:

  • The Courier of Caswell Hall by Melanie Dobson

Enter today by clicking one of the icons below. But hurry, the giveaway ends on October 5th. All winners will be announced October 7th at the Litfuse blog.

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